Saddles Around The World

Brazilian Saddle

Image from Eduardo Amorim

One of the most important elements of horsemanship has to be the saddle. Through the years and cultures shapes and sizes may change but they all fulfill the same basic need…staying on.

Through my many public domain browsing sessions I run across all kinds of fun stuff and today is no exception. Saddles from a variety of places and peoples.

Chilean Saddle

Chilean Saddle

Image from Ealdgyth
Japanese Saddle

Japanese Saddle

Image from Corpse_Reviver
Mongolian Saddle

Mongolian Saddle

Image from Yaan
Collegiate Eventer Saddle

Collegiate Eventer Saddle

Image from Yaan
Australian Half-Breed Saddle

Australian Half-Breed Saddle

Image from Cgoodwin
Western Saddle

Western Saddle

Image from nicoleanjolie
German Side Saddle

German Side Saddle

Image from Hutschi
Racing Saddle

Racing Saddle

Image from Eglos

Some Softer Than Others

This is just a taste of horse tack (and horse culture) from around the globe. Each saddle is designed to suit specific needs, but each serves the same overall purpose. Stay tuned for some pics of antique saddles.

9 Comments on “Saddles Around The World

  1. English Saddles

    Thanks for showing the different saddles but actually I am using English Saddles because these saddles have light weights and were primarily designed to allow the horse freedom of movement, whether jumping, running, or moving quickly across rugged, broken country with fences.

    Reply
  2. Jane

    What a wonderful post! Interesting to see the saddles we are familiar with the saddles from different cultures. I love the diversity. I’m fascinated by the Japanese saddle, with the curved…knee rest? they look far too short to be stirrups, but perhaps they are. Anyone know?

    Reply
  3. MJC

    Interessing webpage! Concerning japanese saddle, “curved knee rest” is actually an antique pair of stirrups used by samurai and today’s yabusame archers! They are named “abumi”. Thank you! :)

    Reply
  4. Diane

    It’s interesting that the more ‘cultural’ people’s are very mindful about padding on the horses’ backs. When you look at the western and english the padding is much more basic.

    Reply

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